Monday, February 19, 2018

When will Mueller indict Christopher Steele?

Special Counsel Robert Mueller indicted foreign citizens for trying to influence the American public about an election because those citizens did not register as a foreign agent nor record their financial expenditures to the Federal Elections Commission. By that theory, when will Mueller indict Christopher Steele, FusionGPS, PerkinsCoie, the DNC and the Clinton Campaign? Mueller’s indictment against 13 Russian trolls claimed their social media political activity was criminal because: they were foreign citizens; they tried to influence an election; and they neither registered under the Foreign Agents Registration Act nor reported their funding to the Federal Elections Commission.

First, if Mueller’s theory is correct, three things make Steele a criminal: first, he is a foreign citizen; second, he tried to influence an election, which he received payments to do (including from the FBI itself); and third, he neither registered as a foreign agent nor listed his receipts and expenditures to the Federal Election Commission. Also, according to the FBI, along the way, Steele lied…a lot, while the dossier he disseminated contained its own lies based on bought-and-paid for smears from foreign sources reliant on rumors and innuendo.

Second, if Mueller’s theory is correct, three things make FusionGPS a criminal co-conspirator: it knew Steele was a foreign citizen; it knew, and paid, Steele to influence an election; and it knew, and facilitated, Steele neither registering as a foreign agent nor reporting his funding from the Democratic National Committee and the Clinton campaign to the Federal Election Commission.

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Don't buy anything that is made in China

A nightmare became reality for Nikki Mael when her five dogs began acting strange minutes after digging into a can of Evanger’s pet food on New Year’s Eve 2016. The Washougal, Washington resident and her family raced to the vet’s office, where Talula the dog soon passed away.

"They were falling over. They were running into the walls. They were convulsing," Mael told ABC7 of the horrifying incident. "Nobody should have to go through what we went through. I would give anything to see Talula again."

Devastated, Mael sent the remainder of the Evanger’s food to a lab for testing, where it was discovered that the dog food contained traces of pentobarbital, a lethal drug most commonly used for the euthanisation of dogs, cats and horses, ABC7 reports.

Though the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) bans pentobarbital in animal meat for animal or human consumption, pet food consumer advocate Susan Thixton told the outlet that tragically, such substances often end up in pet food.

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Decline in enrollment at wacko college

The president of the embattled Evergreen State College where racial unrest last spring thrust the small Washington campus into the national spotlight is predicting that the public institution will see a nearly 20 percent drop in student enrollment come fall.

President George Bridges has told the campus community that the school’s 3,800 student population is predicted to hover at about 3,100 when the 2018-19 school year begins. This 700-student loss represents an 18.5 percent decrease.

This estimate sent shock waves among faculty, and some speculate it spurred an anonymous call for Bridges’ resignation by way of flyers recently inserted into faculty mailboxes declaring "Please Resign," among other disparaging comments.

The Olympia, Washington-based school already was hit with a 5 percent enrollment decrease when it started this current 2017-18 school year.

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Compulsory to wear the hijab in some schools in the UK

Around 150 schools have made it compulsory for children to wear the hijab and the government is too politically correct to step in and do anything about it, according to the former head of Ofsted.

Sir Michael Wilshaw said: "There’s something like 150 schools…. which in short make it compulsory for youngsters to wear a hijab so what’s happening about those schools?

"The country has enormously changed. When heads want to change things, they have now to take into account deep-seated and sincere feeling of communities, some of whom who have conservative views.

"The government needs to step in. It can no longer say it’s up to the headteachers. That head might be faced with an opposition which says, well hang on, you made this decision, but there’s a school half a mile away which does allow (wearing hijabs for primary aged children)."

Asked if the government is too politically correct to step in and sort it out, he said: "Yes absolutely. There is a reticence, and it’s leaving headteachers alone, isolated and vulnerable."

Earlier this month Westmonster reported on Ofsted’s chief inspector saying some faith schools were deliberately undermining British values, perverting young people’s minds and "indoctrinating impressionable minds with extremist ideology".

The government needs to step in and get a grip of this, the hijab is supposed to be a free choice.

Source

Mueller's assistant accused of corrupt legal practices

The top attorney in Robert Mueller’s Special Counsel’s office was reported to the Department of Justice’s Inspector General by a lawyer representing whistleblowers for alleged "corrupt legal practices" more than a year before the 2016 presidential election and a decade before to the Senate Judiciary Committee , this reporter has learned.

Described by the New York Times as Mueller's pitbull, Andrew Weissmann, a former Eastern District of New York Assistant U.S. Attorney, rose through the ranks to eventually become Mueller’s general counsel at the F.B.I.

In 2015 Weissmann was selected to run the Department of Justice’s criminal fraud section and was later handpicked by Mueller to join the ongoing Special Counsel’s Office investigation into the alleged obstruction and alleged collusion between Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign and Russia.

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First black lieutenant governor

Back in 1976, when Brian Mitchell was eight years old, a teacher in his Louisiana school system asked if anyone in the class was related to a famous figure from the state’s history. Mitchell, who had spent his childhood listening to family stories, said he was related to the legendary Oscar James Dunn. But according to Mitchell, his teacher had no idea who that was. "He’s the first black Lieutenant Governor, not just for Louisiana, but for the entire nation," Mitchell remembers saying. "There’s never been a black lieutenant governor of Louisiana," his teacher replied.

But there was, and he was Mitchell’s great great great-uncle. "As I child, I’d spend my days after school with my great-grandmother," Mitchell recalls. And her family stories "always sort of lead to important patriarchs or matriarchs," including Dunn. Now Mitchell is an assistant professor of history at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, and he’s spent much of his career studying Dunn so future teachers don’t make the same mistake his did some four decades ago.

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Saturday, February 17, 2018

Odds and ends

Headline....700,000 people attended the Eagles Super Bowl parade, only 2 people stabbed

Mallory Millet...."My thesis is this: when men ran the world and women ran society we had a chance to conduct our lives in some semblance of balance, but women have abdicated their running of society and thus, it has collapsed dramatically."

Sweden....Police are stepping up their anti-gang activity. Police patrols who enter the ghettos are routinely met by a hail of stones and bottles, but this may get deadly as the heavily armed gangs react to what they regard as police provocations. In the immigrant-dominated city of Malmö, all police stations have been put under round the clock guard by heavily armed police.

Headline....Conservatives who vowed to cut spending keep spending.

Wikileaks....Conservative Pope Benedict was forced to resign by Deep State.

Headline....Energy taxes too low to fight climate change.

Despite warming temperatures in much of the world, winters in the Southeast U.S. have grown colder in recent decades, an anomaly that scientists are calling a "hole" in global warming, or a "warming hole." (my B.S. detector is moving up on this)

Of the estimated 12,000,000 blacks who were brought to the Western Hemisphere, only some 500,000 were brought to what became the United Statesabout 5 percent. It was not necessary to import more than that because slave population grew naturally.

Muslims imported more black slaves to the Middle East and over a longer period than North Americans did, but there are few blacks in the region today. That is because Muslims frequently castrated slaves, and when Muslim owners impregnated black concubines, they often killed the babies.

Only 6 percent of Southerners owned slaves, and half of the owners had five or fewer. Only a small number of Southerners were slaveholders because, just prior to the Civil War, the purchase price of a slave was about $23,000 in today’s dollars. A slave with artisan skills could cost up to the equivalent of $56,700. Whites had an incentive to keep their expensive "property" healthy.

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn....Gradually it was disclosed to me that the line separating good and evil passes not through states, nor between classes, nor between political parties either but right through every human heart and through all human hearts.

None of the individuals and groups that Mueller has indicted can be extradited to the U.S. Nothing about collusion with Trump in the indictment. Nothing to do with the outcome of the election. No Americans named. And why does Mueller refuse to indict Christopher Steele, the author of the FISA memo?

Police were called to the Florida school shooter's house more than 35 times over the last six years. Once for fighting with his mother.

A major bakery on the Northwest Side of Chicago once known for making Little Debbie snack cakes was sold earlier this month after an immigration audit cost the company about a third of its workers.

Headline....Goldman Sachs CEO gives Trump credit for economy, says better than if Hillary won

Ronald Reagan...."The Democrats belief system: If it moves, tax it. If it continues to move, regulate it. If it stops moving, subsidize it."

Animal-rights activists are outraged by the efforts made by inmates to barbecue a dog at an immigrant "welcome center" in southern Italy.

~

Air pollution caused by some common items

Shampoo, oven cleaner, deodorant and other household products are as significant a source of the most dangerous form of air pollution as cars, research has found.

Scientists studying air pollution in Los Angeles found that up to half of particles known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) came from domestic products, which also include paint, pesticides, bleach and perfumes.

These compounds degrade into particles known as PM2.5, which cause respiratory problems and are implicated in 29,000 premature deaths each year in the UK. Traffic had been assumed to be the biggest source of air pollution. The new findings, published in the journal Science, led to warnings that countries may struggle to hit pollution targets, with most tackling vehicle emissions.

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Hungary is targeting George Soros

Hungary’s nationalist government introduced legislation that would empower the interior minister to ban non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that support migration and pose a "national security risk".

The bill, submitted to parliament late on Tuesday, is a key part of Prime Minister Viktor Orban’s anti-immigration campaign targeting U.S. financier George Soros whose philanthropy aims to bolster liberal and open-border values in eastern Europe.

The government says the bill, which would also impose a 25 percent tax on foreign donations to NGOs that back migration in Hungary, is meant to deter illegal immigration Orban says is eroding European stability and has been stoked in part by Soros.

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Stubborn facts

Many academics in the modern world seem obsessed with the sex difference in engagement with science, technology, mathematics, and engineering (STEM) fields. Or rather they are obsessed with the fact that there are more men than women in some of these fields. There is particular concern about the lack of women in prestigious STEM fields, such as Ph.D.-level faculty positions, but surprisingly there is no concern about the under-representation of women in lower-level technical jobs, such as car mechanics or plumbing.

The concerned academics have been especially effective in convincing others, or at least intimidating them, into accepting their preferred interpretations regarding the source of these sex differences. These interpretations are not surprising and they include sexism, stereotype threat, and more recently implicit bias and microaggression. Each of these ideas has gained traction in the mainstream media and in many academic circles but their scientific foundations are shaky. In this essay, we’ll provide some background on the STEM controversy and consider multiple factors that might contribute to these sex differences.

The U.S. National Science Foundation reports that women are awarded 57 percent of undergraduate STEM degrees, but with substantial differences across fields. Women earn the majority of degrees in the life and social sciences but less than 20 percent of the degrees in computer science and engineering, sex differences that have held steady for several decades. The STEM debate is primarily about sex differences in educational and later occupational choices in inorganic fields, those focused on understanding non-living things. These differences are socially important because these tend to be prestigious occupations, and practically important because the different numbers of men and women in these fields contribute, in part, to the sex difference in earnings.

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Fake news origins

In a Tedx Talk at the University of Nevada a couple of weeks ago investigative journalist Sharyl Attkisson revealed the origins of the "fake news" narrative that was aggressively pushed by the liberal media and Democrat politicians during the 2016 election, and how it was later flipped by President Donald Trump.

Attkisson pointed out that "fake news" in the form of tabloid journalism and false media narratives has always been around under different names.

But she noticed that in 2016, there seemed to be a concerted effort by the MSM to focus America's attention on the idea of "fake news" in conservative media. That looked like a propaganda effort to Attkisson, so she did a little digging and traced the new spin to a little non-profit called "First Draft," which, she said, "appears to be the about the first to use 'fake news' in its modern context."

"On September 13, 2016, First Draft announced a partnership to tackle malicious hoaxes and fake news reports," Attkisson explained. "The goal was supposedly to separate wheat from chaff, to prevent unproven conspiracy talk from figuring prominently in internet searches. To relegate today's version of the alien baby story to a special internet oblivion."

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Leaking is more preferable to the CIA

Intelligence officials can selectively release classified information to trusted journalists while withholding the same information from other citizens who request it through open records laws, CIA lawyers argued Wednesday.

In a motion filed in New York federal court, the CIA claimed that limited disclosures to reporters do not waive national security exemptions to Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests. Intelligence and law enforcement agencies frequently deny records requests on the basis of protecting sensitive national security information, one of nine exemptions written into the federal FOIA law.

The case stems from lawsuit against the CIA by New York-based independent journalist Adam Johnson, who had used FOIA to obtain emails between the agency’s public information office and selected reporters from the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post and The New York Times. The emails the CIA provided to Johnson were redacted, leading him to question why he was not allowed to see the same information that had been given to uncleared reporters.

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California makes it hard for ICE

After reports recently rippled across California’s agricultural heartland that immigration agents might audit farms, Bryan Little of the California Farm Bureau Federation sent an email alert to thousands of farmers warning them not to run afoul of a new state law governing their interactions with federal immigration officials.

The law requires California employers to ask immigration agents for warrants or subpoenas before allowing them access to private areas of the workplace or confidential employee records. Employers who break the law, which took effect in January, face fines of up to $10,000.

Businesses are increasingly caught between California and Washington as the state seeks to shield illegal immigrants from deportation, and the Trump administration intensifies enforcement. As the state works out how to enforce the law, employers say the new requirements are confusing.

More here

Friday, February 16, 2018

Farrakhan's friend in Congress

Democratic Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison, the deputy chair of the Democratic National Committee, has attended multiple meetings with Nation of Islam Minister Louis Farrakhan while in Congress, The Daily Caller has learned.

Ellison’s past ties to Farrakhan are well known: he admitted to The Washington Post during his first congressional campaign in 2006 that he worked with the Nation of Islam for approximately 18 months ahead of Farrakhan’s 1995 Million Man March. Since he ran for Congress, Ellison has repeatedly promised the public that he left Farrakhan in the past.

But Ellison’s associations with Farrakhan continued even as he served in Congress, TheDC has found.

Ellison attended at least three meetings where Farrakhan was present including a private visit to Farrakhan’s hotel room according to photos and videos reviewed by TheDC and Farrakhan’s own statements.

More here

Having sex with someone you arrest

In 35 states, it’s legal for cops to detain and have sex with someone in their custody. Is your state one of them?

Yesterday, Buzzfeed News published an investigative piece about Anna Chambers, a New York teenager pressing rape charges against Eddie Martins and Richard Hall, two members of the New York Police Department. Last fall, Anna was picked up by the two cops who told her two male friends to leave, handcuffed her, and led her into their van. According to Anna’s lawyer, the policemen ordered her to undress and when they didn’t find drugs, they raped her.

It’s a stunning story of state violence of cops using their guns, their badges, and their impunity to attack vulnerable women. Anna’s far from alone: sexual assault is the second most commonly reported form of police misconduct and brutality (after excessive force). A 2015 investigation found that over 1,000 officers across America have lost their badges because of sexual assault and their report noted that number is "unquestionably an undercount" because many states, including New York, don’t keep state records of decertified cops. Further, sexual violence and police violence are highly underreported meaning these number represent a mere fraction of the actual prevalence of police-perpetrated sexual violence.

You’d think this would have been an open-and-shut case. Anna’s forensic exam (commonly known as a ‘rape kit’) matched Martins’ and Hall’s DNA, and a security camera shows the detectives leaving her on the side of a street a quarter-mile from a police station. Anna says she repeatedly told the detectives no; the detectives say it was consensual.

More here

Quote of the day


The high cost of migrants

The monumental costs of providing for migrants in Germany who claim to be 'unaccompanied minors' have been revealed in a new report by Welt - just months after the German government admitted that nearly half of these so-called children are actually adults.

According to federal figures, the expense per 'child' migrant averaged approximately €50,000 ($61,000) nationally in 2017, with social services agencies in certain regions detailing that they had invested much more - over $70,000 per case.

"A total of 105.2 million euros were spent on housing and providing for unaccompanied minor refugees," announced the Social Ministry in Kiel, capital of the Germany state of Schleswig-Holstein.

"1795 unaccompanied minor foreigners were cared for, of which 775 are now adults," Marcel Leubecher of Welt explains. "This resulted in an average of around 58,600 euros to book an unaccompanied minor in the northernmost province."

It should be noted that the federal government, which has transformed Germany into a veritable beacon for economic migrants from the Third World under the leadership of Chancellor Angela Merkel, only covers a small portion of these expenses, leaving states and municipalities to come up with the lion's share.

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Worst colleges for free speech

Each year, colleges across the country find dubious ways to silence student and faculty expression. In the last year, administrators became embroiled in litigation for telling a student he couldn’t hand out Spanish-language copies of the U.S. Constitution outside a free speech zone, continued a years-long effort to ban a group from campus due to its political viewpoint, and even investigated a professor for a satirical tweet eventually driving him to resign.

The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education has identified America’s 10 worst colleges for free speech, published today with detailed descriptions on FIRE's website.

This year’s list includes the following institutions, in no particular order:
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Troy, N.Y.)
Drexel University (Philadelphia, Pa.)
Harvard University (Cambridge, Mass.)
Los Angeles Community College District (Los Angeles, Calif.)
Fordham University (New York, N.Y.)
Evergreen State College (Olympia, Wash.)
Albion College (Albion, Mich.)
Northwestern University (Evanston, Ill.)
University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, Calif.)
Texas State University (San Marcos, Texas)

The institutions on FIRE's annual list of worst colleges include one university that threatened the funding and editorial process of its independent student newspaper, another that erected fences around campus to keep peaceful student demonstrators out of sight of donors, and yet another that put a student through a months-long investigation and a four-hour hearing for a joke. (That student is still waiting to learn his fate!)

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Trending, School suspensions

A quarter of black students in the Racine Unified School District received at least one out-of-school suspension during the 2015-16 school year.

During the same time frame, 7.2 percent of Hispanic students and 5 percent of white students were suspended. These three ethnic groups made up the majority of the student population in 2015-16, when 26.4 percent of students were black, 27 percent were Hispanic and 41 percent were white.

The percentage of black students suspended or prohibited from going to school for up to five days in 2015-16 was higher at Racine Unified than at either in the Kenosha Unified district or in Milwaukee Public Schools.

In that year the most recent year for which data is available from the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction 21 percent of black Kenosha Unified students were suspended and 20 percent of black MPS students were suspended.

More here

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Seattle says no to surveillance

Following years of resistance from citizens, the city of Seattle has decided to completely remove controversial surveillance equipment at a cost of $150,000. In November 2013, Seattle residents pushed back against the installation of several mesh network nodes attached to utility poles around the downtown area. The American Civil Liberties Union of Washington and privacy advocates were immediately concerned about the ability of the nodes to gather user information via the Wi-Fi connection.

The Seattle Times reports on the latest developments:
Seattle’s wireless mesh network, a node of controversy about police surveillance and the role of federal funding in city policing, is coming down.

Megan Erb, spokeswoman for Seattle Information Technology, said the city has budgeted $150,000 for contractor Prime Electric and city employees to remove dozens of surveillance cameras and 158 "wireless access points" little, off-white boxes with antennae mounted on utility poles around the city.

The nodes were purchased by the Seattle Police Department via a $3.6 million grant from the Department of Homeland Security. The Seattle Police Department argued the network would be helpful for protecting the port and for first-responder communication during emergencies. As the Times notes, "the mesh network, according to the ACLU, news reports and anti-surveillance activists from Seattle Privacy Coalition, had the potential to track and log every wireless device that moved through its system: people attending protests, people getting cups of coffee, people going to a hotel in the middle of the workday."

More here

Dismissal of Flynn case?

I have been wondering why, shortly after Judge Rudolph Contreras was (without explanation) recused from hearing the Michael Flynn case and Judge Emmet G. Sullivan took over, Special Counsel Robert Mueller agreed to postpone the sentencing until May, after the inspector general's report is due.

I have no assurances that my suppositions are correct, but I'm beginning to think that at the next hearing of this case, Judge Sullivan will hear Mueller dismiss the case. Here's how I come to that.

The only reason I can imagine why Judge Contreras was recused note: did not recuse himself is that he was a member of the FISC, the court that grants surveillance warrants under FISA. As the evidence mounts that the warrant was improperly granted, someone perhaps the chief judge of the district removed him from further participation in the case, likely because Contreras approved the warrant and its extension. If the warrant was improperly issued, all the evidence it garnered is tainted.

As to why the agreed upon delay, my thought is that Mueller wants to wait until the inspector general report so that, in a sense, his hands will be clean if the case is dropped, that he was compelled by the record to do so.

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Brennan is target of perjury investigation

Obama appointee and former CIA director John Brennan is the target of a perjury investigation by the House Intelligence Committee, according to an exclusive Real Clear Investigations report.

Chairman Devin Nunes is turning his attention to the role the CIA played in promoting the Steele dossier. The FBI and Justice Department relied heavily on the unverified dossier in their applications for a FISA warrant to spy on the Trump campaign.

Brennan said under oath that he didn't know who commissioned the document and that the dossier was not used to come to the conclusion that Russia had meddled in the 2016 presidential campaign.

Brennan also swore that he did not know who commissioned the anti-Trump research document, even though senior national security and counterintelligence officials at the Justice Department and FBI knew the previous year that the dossier was funded by the Hillary Clinton campaign.

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Intelgate

Stephen Cohen, professor emeritus of Russian Studies and Politics at NYU and Princeton, and John Batchelor continue their (usually) weekly discussions of the new US-Russian Cold War. (Previous installments, now in their fourth year, are at TheNation.com)

Cohen first raised the question of "Intelgate," perhaps coining the word, in the first half of 2017. He returns to it here.

Referring to the memo whose preparation was overseen by Republican Congressman Devin Nunes and whose release was authorized by President Trump, and to similar reports likely to come, Cohen, having for years researched Soviet-era archive materials (once highly classified), understands the difficulties involved in summarizing such secret documents, especially when they have been generated by intelligence agencies. They must be put in the larger political context of the time, which can be fully understood only by using other sources as well, including open ones; and they may be contradicted by other classified materials not yet available.

Nonetheless, the "Republican memo," as it has become known while we await its Democratic counterpart, indicates that some kind of operation against presidential candidate and then President Trump, an "investigation," has been under way among top officials of US intelligence agencies for a long time. The memo focuses on questionable methods used by Obama’s FBI and Justice Department to obtain a warrant permitting them to surveil Carter Page, a peripheral and short-tenured Trump foreign-policy adviser, and the role played in this by the anti-Trump "dossier" complied by Christopher Steele, a former British intelligence officer whose career specialization was Russia. But the memo’s implications are even larger.

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Liberia has some strange laws

The chair of the House of Representatives’ Good Governance Committee says he is alarmed over a recent push by President George Manneh Weah to allow individuals who are not black to become citizens and own properties in Liberia.

In his first State of the Nation address, the president called for a repeal of the clauses of the constitution limiting citizenship to only those of Negro descent and limiting land ownership to only citizens.

Weah said that in the 19th century, those clauses were necessary given the threats the country faced then.

"However, here in the 21st century, I am of the view that these threats no longer exist, and that these conditions have changed," he said. "In these circumstances, it is my view that keeping such a clause in our constitution is unnecessary, racist, and inappropriate for the place that Liberia occupies today in the comity of nations."

Weah called on both houses to repeal these clauses in the constitution to send the message that "Liberia is open for business."

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Separate tribes

The diversity bureaucracy has finally swallowed an entire college. San Diego State University has just named to its presidency a vice chancellor of student affairs and campus diversity, hired from the University of California, Davis. The new SDSU president, Adela de la Torre, is a peerless example of the intersection of identity politics and the ballooning student-services bureaucracy.

As vice chancellor of student affairs and campus diversity at UC Davis, de la Torre presided over a division made up of a whopping 28 departmentsnot academic departments, but bureaucratic and identity-based ones, such as the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, Asexual Resource Center; the Center for African Diaspora Student Success; the Center for Chicanx and Latinx Student Success; the Native American Academic Student Success Center; the Middle Eastern/South Asian Student Affairs Office; the Women’s Resources and Research Center; the Undocumented Student Center; Retention Initiatives; the Office of Educational Opportunity and Enrichment Services; and the Center for First-Generation Student Scholars. This gallimaufry of identity-based fiefdoms illustrates the symbiosis between an artificially segmented, identity-obsessed student body and the campus bureaucracy: the more that students carve themselves into micro-groups claiming oppressed status, the more pretext there is for new cadres of administrators to shield them from oppression. (The causation runs in the opposite direction as well: the very existence of such identity-based bureaucracies encourages students to see themselves as belonging to separate tribes.) The admission of students who do not share the academic qualifications of their peers also creates a vast bureaucratic genre of retention services, one now taking aim at traditional pedagogy said to handicap underrepresented minorities.

More here

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Female models make more than male models (gasp!)

While the BBC may be in hot water for the gender disparity highlighted in its recent salary report, there has been little said about the state of pay within the fashion industry.

A new study, however, has shed some light on the situation - and women come out on top.

Reportedly earning around 75% more than their male counterparts, women make up 9 of the top 10 highest earning models in British fashion.

Losing her place in the top spot is Kate Moss, who has been overtaken financially by friend and model 19 years her junior Cara Delevingne.

More here

John Brennan, leaker

The newest sieve in town is former CIA Director John Brennan, according to well-placed sources inside the White House and federal law enforcement.

Brennan, shortly after President Donald Trump was elected and before he was sworn into office participated in a series of leaks and lies to damage the Trump administration even before it was officially up and running, according to White House and federal law enforcement sources.

A Deep State smear campaign to damage the incoming Republican administration.

Brennan, who at the time was CIA Director, teamed with Sen. John McCain to plant negative stories in the mainstream press to discredit Trump and undermine the results of the 2016 election, sources confirm.

Just weeks after Trump’s election in early December 2016 the Central Intelligence Agency was the major source in a national Washington Post story linking the Russian government to hacking the presidential election to help Trump, according to CIA personnel with direct knowledge of the case.

More here

Still trying to verify items in the Trump Dossier

For the last six months, a team led by a former top FBI and White House cybersecurity official has been traveling the globe on a secret mission to verify parts of the Trump dossier, according to four sources familiar with different aspects of the ongoing probe.

Their client: BuzzFeed, the news organization that first published the dossier on U.S. President Donald Trump’s alleged ties to Russia, which is now being sued over its explosive allegations.

The investigation, being conducted by FTI Consulting, is running in parallel to special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia in Kremlin-directed efforts to interfere with the 2016 presidential election. With the special counsel probe under wraps, the BuzzFeed court case could represent the first public airing of an investigation into the veracity of some of the dossier’s claims.

FTI is a Washington-based business advisory firm that specializes in areas ranging from corporate litigation to forensic accounting, and it is a frequent post-government landing pad for FBI officials.

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Fleeing Venezuela

People are fleeing the socialism forced on them in Venezuela by the hundreds of thousands. Starving, and facing violence over crumbs of food, many have no choice but to flee the wasteland which used the authority of government to destroy the lives of its citizens.

Thousands of Venezuelans are attempting to flee the socialist dystopia their nation has become. They are attempting to make it to Colombia. In a desperate bid to escape the hunger and soaring crime rate caused by the spiraling economic crisis, fueled by socialist policies, incredible pictures have surfaced showing the mass exodus of refugees crossing the Simon Bolivar international bridge trying to flee the ongoing political crisis threatening to engulf Venezuela.

Colombia and its neighbor Brazil have both sent extra soldiers to patrol their porous borders with Venezuela after officially taking in more than half a million migrants over the last six months of 2017. The country is also tightening its border controls in a bid to stem the flow of starving people. The situation in Venezuela has reached SHTF levels.

Truck drivers are subjected to horrific violence as looters target heavy goods vehicles carrying food in a desperate attempt to feed their families. The truckers are banned by the government from carrying guns to protect themselves, so have resorted to forming convoys to protect each other. They text each other warnings about potential trouble spots and keep moving as fast as possible.

More here

Quote of the day


Did Prince Charles convert to Islam?

In a 1997 Middle East Quarterly article titled "Prince Charles of Arabia," Ronni L. Gordon and David M. Stillman looked at evidence that Britain's crown prince might be a secret convert to Islam. They shifted through his public statements (defending Islamic law, praising the status of Muslim women, seeing in Islam a solution for Britain's ailments) and actions (setting up a panel of twelve "wise men" to advise him on Islamic religion and culture), then concluded that, "should Charles persist in his admiration of Islam and defamation of his own culture," his accession to the throne will indeed usher in a "different kind of monarchy."

Charles continues this pattern of admiration and defamation, keeping alive the question of his stealth conversion to Islam. This weblog entry continues to document the topic, starting with a report, "Charles Breaks Fast with the Faithful in Muscat," in the Dubai-based Gulf News, on some of Charles' activities during his current five-day visit to Oman::

He toured the Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque for almost two hours and "took keen interest in studying various sections at the mosque, including the main prayer hall." As his spokesman put it, "The Prince was particularly keen to come to the mosque today to see the fantastic building and remarkable architecture which Prince was fascinated with. The Prince has a great love for Islamic architecture and I can't think of finer example than this mosque."

He "spent a considerable time at an exhibition of Islamic calligraphy and held meetings with Sheikha Aisha Al Siaby, Head of Public Authority for Craft Industries and Taha Al Kisri, the Head of Omani Society for Fine Arts to discuss various aspects of Islamic art."

He "broke fast with a large congregation of people from different nationalities as he sat with folded legs on the floor in the open. He ate date and drank juice at the call of Iftar."

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It's so cold Eskimos stay inside

Rankin Inlet, Nunavut gets cold in the winter. Located on the northwestern shore of the Hudson Bay at 62 degrees north and between Chesterfield Inlet and Arviat, the town is definitely in a remote yet exposed region. Weather is just a part of life and recently the weather has been colder than cold.

Schools in the south get "snow days" though when you get to the 60-degree latitudes school closures are "cold days"…usually accompanied by some snow as well. When temperatures fall to -60C with the windchill or more than just about everyone will stay home and not risk going outside and expose skin. For the past few days, schools have cautiously remained closed.

"I don’t remember the last time we actually closed due to weather. This is a bit of an extreme," said Mike Osmond, chair of the Rankin Inlet District Education Authority.

Temperatures are getting to 40 C (-40F) before the windchill and when the winds are factored in, it feels colder than 60 C (-76F).

"You’ve got blustery winds with some of the coldest temperatures that people have ever experienced," said David Phillips, senior climatologist with Environment Canada, adding that his charts say skin freezes in two minutes at 55 C.(-67F)

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Tuesday, February 13, 2018

This is the year to divorce

Republicans may pride themselves on upholding family values, but their new tax law could soon lead to a surge in married couples calling it quits.

Lawyers are counseling couples considering divorce to do it this year before a 76-year-old deduction for alimony payments is wiped out in 2019 under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

"Now’s not the time to wait," said Mary Vidas, a lawyer in Philadelphia and former chair of the American Bar Association’s section on family law. "If you’re going to get a divorce, get it now."

Potential divorcees have all of 2018 to use the alimony deduction as a bargaining chip in their negotiations with estranged spouses.

The deduction substantially reduces the cost of alimony payments for people in the highest income-tax bracket, it means every dollar they pay to support a former spouse really costs them a little more than 60 cents.

The change is an example of how the tax law is having far-reaching consequences beyond its corporate and individual tax cuts, in some cases by quietly overturning decades of tax policy.

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A new caste is forming in India

We can tell illegals till the cows come home that learning English is the real path to assimilation and upward mobility and all we hear is that diversity is "strength" or maybe that we have yanqui imperialista racist prejudices.

But over in India, we are seeing that idea coming to life.

Quartz has a long and utterly fascinating piece by Sajith Pai, titled "India has a new caste for native English speakers only,' describing how English is not only a great skill to have in the global economy, and a path upward in a big striving country such as India, something we all recognize here, too, it's positively trashing India's dreadful caste system and creating a new class of people who speak almost exclusively English, by choice. Pai writes:

Unlike Anglo-Indians, the original English-speaking community in India, who were Christians, Indo-Anglians comprise all religions, though Hindus dominate. Indo-Anglians are also a highly urban lot; concentrated in the top seven large cities of India (Mumbai, Delhi, Bangalore, Chennai, Pune, Hyderabad, and Kolkata) with a smattering across the smaller towns in the hills and in Goa.

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Bell P-39 Airacobra

The Bell P-39 Airacobra was one of the principal American fighter aircraft in service when the United States entered World War II. The P-39 was used by the Soviet Air Force, which scored the highest number of individual kills attributed to any U.S. fighter type in the Eastern European theatre. Other major users of the type included the Free French, the Royal Air Force, the United States Army Air Forces, and the Italian Co-Belligerent Air Force.

Designed by Bell Aircraft, it had an innovative layout, with the engine installed in the center fuselage, behind the pilot, and driving a tractor propeller via a long shaft. It was also the first fighter fitted with a tricycle undercarriage. Although its mid-engine placement was innovative, the P-39 design was handicapped by the absence of an efficient turbo-supercharger, preventing it from performing high-altitude work. As such it was rejected by the RAF for use over western Europe but adopted by the USSR where most air combat took place at medium and lower altitudes.

Together with the derivative P-63 Kingcobra, the P-39 was one of the most successful fixed-wing aircraft manufactured by Bell.

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Saudi Arabia getting back to normal

The last members of the nearly 200 Saudi elite - including Prince Alwaleed bin Talal and at least 10 other princes - have either been freed or moved to other, more permanent (and probably less comfortable) detention centers - after three months of reportedly brutal interrogations left at least one casualty from Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman's "corruption crackdown/cash grab."

Bin Talal, one of the richest prisoners caught up in the crackdown, reportedly paid $6 billion for his freedom after the resistant prince was briefly moved to the state's highest security prison, along with about 60 other detainees. It's not clear how many remain.

But regardless of what happens to the royals who have refused to hand over their money - or perhaps don't have enough liquid assets to satisfy their zealous relative - the Riyadh Ritz Carlton, the primary backdrop for the drama that has unfolded over the past few months, has reopened to the public.

And presumably, all the trappings of its temporary status as the world's most luxurious prison, have been swept away to comfortably accommodate the legions of foreign businessmen (remember, they're almost all men) who reside there during visits to the kingdom.

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Slash spending, or not

Tea party Republicans arrived in Washington seven years ago with a clear, loud message from angry voters: Slash spending. But once again, spending is going way up.

"Part of our job right now (is) that we keep pounding that Republicans still stand for fiscal responsibility," said Rep. Mark Walker, R-N.C., who chairs the House Republican Study Committee, a coalition of conservatives.

But he was on the losing side as the House early Friday cleared a massive two-year spending package that President Donald Trump quickly signed into law. Sixty-seven Republicans voted against the two-year budget plan that became law Friday, but 167 voted yes.

The bill could add as much as $320 billion to the debt over the next 10 years, according to the Congressional Budget Office, and push the fiscal 2019 deficit past $1.2 trillion, according to the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, a research group. The deal included about $100 billion in offsets, not enough to assuage many conservatives.

It was one of the biggest deficit-busters since the 2009 economic stimulus plan that spent nearly $800 billion as the nation reeled from the Great Recession of 2007-09. Since then, other budget bills have been approved by familiar Republican-Democrat coalitions, with tea party loyalists usually opposed.

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Monday, February 12, 2018

Everyone is a racist

Americans consider blacks more likely to be racist than whites and Hispanics in this country.

Thirty-seven percent (37%) of American Adults think most black Americans are racist, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. Just 15% consider most white Americans racist, while 18% say the same of most Hispanic Americans.

There is a huge ideological difference on this topic. Among conservative Americans, 49% consider most blacks racist, and only 12% see most whites that way. Among liberal voters, 27% see most white Americans as racist, and 21% say the same about black Americans.

From a partisan perspective, 49% of Republicans see most black Americans as racist, along with 36% of unaffiliated adults and 29% of Democrats.

Among black Americans, 31% think most blacks are racist, while 24% consider most whites racist and 15% view most Hispanics that way.

Among white adults, 10% think most white Americans are racist; 38% believe most blacks are racist, and 17% say most Hispanics are racist.

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Progressive psychos

True believers are incapable of accepting disconfirmation. The reason for this is their individual identity becomes so entangled in the cause, that anything contradicting the cause is viewed as a personal assault. That’s why Progressives react to contacts with reality as if they have been violently assaulted. For them, there is no line separating themselves and the cause. An assault on the cause, even just contrary facts, is felt like a kick to the groin. It’s why Progressive women equate free speech with violence.

There’s another product of this and that’s the inability to adapt to political reality. They set off on a course, with a pleasing narrative in their head, and stick with it no matter what happens. This delusional determination is why the Left keeps at their pet causes with a great deal of success, but it is also why they eventually burn themselves out in an orgy of recrimination. They can’t let go of the dream, even when the cause is lost, so they look for people to blame.

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Me too, me too

If the #MeToo movement only reduces sexual predation in the workplace, it will have been a force for good. Its most likely result, however, will be to unleash a torrent of new gender and race quotas throughout the economy and culture, on the theory that disparities in representation and employment are due to harassment and bias.

Hollywood and the media are already showing the effect. It’s no coincidence that The Today Show now has two female anchors. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has pledged to double its female and minority members by 2020. ... The Wall Street Journal’s pop music critic, Jim Fusilli, for example, groused that females were underrepresented among Grammy award nominees. "No groups led by women are among the nominees in the Best Contemporary Instrumental, Best Jazz Instrumental, Best Large Jazz Ensemble and Best Contemporary Christian Music album categories. ... Six female music industry executives then complained to the Recording Academy’s board of trustees that the Recording Academy’s leadership suffered from "inclusion issues across all demographics." In response, management has penitently promised to overcome the "unconscious biases that impede female advancement" in the music industry. The National Hispanic Media Coalition is planning to protest at the Academy Awards because of the paucity of Hispanic Oscar nominations. Even before the Hispanic protest, Hollywood execs were experiencing quota fatigue, given the pressures from feminist, LGBTQ, and disability activists to hire by identity category.

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Quote of the day


Congressional Racist Caucus?

When Obama met with Farrakhan, it was under the auspices of the Congressional Black Caucus. It wasn't the first or last time that the CBC had been caught in bed with the hate group leader. And CBC members have never been ashamed of their ties to a racist who had praised Hitler as a "great man".

"I’ve been to his home, done meetings, participated in events with him," Rep. Danny Davis declared. "I don’t regard Louis Farrakhan as an aberration or anything, I regard him as an outstanding human being."

The CBC won't sanction Rep. Davis for saying that. In an age when statues are pulled down and classic TV shows are censored, some forms of racism are more equal than others. Not to mention sexism.

The Congressional Black Caucus had a front seat to #MeToo with the revelation that $220,000 had been paid out to a staffer alleging sexual harassment by Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-FL), a former judge impeached for bribery whose girlfriend has been on his payroll to the tune of $2.4 million, and that Rep. Conyers (D-MI) had his own sexual harassment settlement. That scandal forced Rep. Conyers to resign and hand the seat to his son at the behest of his wife, Monica, who had been convicted of bribery.

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Africans in China

Kalifa Feika swapped Sierra Leone for southern China four years ago, determined to manufacture his fortune in the factory of the world.

"The US, you go there on holiday. But to look for money, it is here," declared the 44-year-old evangelical entrepreneur, who grew up in Kenema but now resides in a quarter of Guangzhou, China’s third largest city, known as Little Africa.

For at least 20 years dealmakers and dreamers from across Africa have been flocking to the area around Dengfeng village, an inner-city trading hub that teems with factory outlets hawking every conceivable made-in-China product, from prayer-mats and popcorn machines to police uniforms and political propaganda.

At its peak, about a decade ago, tens of thousands of Africans reputedly lived here, all hoping to repatriate a slice of the economic miracle that has made China the second largest economy on earth. Baohan Street, Little Africa’s main drag, buzzed with Malian merchants and snappily dressed Congolese sapeurs. "You would feel you were in Africa," reminisced Moustapha Dieng, the leader of Guangzhou’s Senegalese community, whose office overlooks the place some locals call "Chocolate City".

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