Friday, February 21, 2014

Many animals see in ultraviolet

A house cat's bizarre antics may be more than just feline folly. The kitty may be seeing things that human eyes can't.

Unlike humans, many animals see in ultraviolet, and a study now suggests that cats, dogs and other mammals can, too. Knowing these animals see things invisible to humans could shed some light on the animals' behavior, the researchers say.

"Nobody ever thought these animals could see in ultraviolet, but in fact, they do," said study leader Ron Douglas, a biologist at City University London, in England.

Light is made up of a spectrum of colors. Visible light (that humans can see) spans from red to violet, and beyond the visible lie ultraviolet wavelengths. Many animals are known to have UV-vision, including insects (such as bees), birds, fish, some amphibians and reptiles, and a handful of mammals (such as some mice, rats, moles, marsupials and bats).

More here

(and what about Infrared?)

2 comments:

Vigilis said...

Some women may see 100 million colors (includes some UV), thanks to their genes
http://goo.gl/23bZUl

2nd para., 2nd sentence here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrachromats#Possibility_of_human_tetrachromats
"It has been suggested that as women have two different X chromosomes in their cells, some of them could be carrying some variant cone cell pigments, thereby possibly being born as full tetrachromats and having four different simultaneously functioning kinds of cone cells, each type with a specific pattern of responsiveness to different wavelengths of light in the range of the visible spectrum. One study suggested that 2–3% of the world's women might have the kind of fourth cone that lies between the standard red and green cones, giving, theoretically, a significant increase in color differentiation."

Contrary in Texas said...

That makes sense because women will differentiate shades of color much more than men will. They even have names that I have never, ever heard of. Ha.